Pure Physical Therapy Blog
 

Some pain with running is totally normal - maybe even unavoidable. One such "adaptive pain" is shin pain (shin splints) which is common with beginning a new program or increasing training volume. Most runners have experienced this at one time or another. Since everyone has different levels of pain tolerance, how do we know what level of pain to run...

Tired of that nagging pain that always creeps up during your run? Unable to increase your distance or improve your times due to "bad knees"? Believe it or not, there are answers to these problems! You can be running pain free again, even if you haven't been for a long time! Here are 3 simple ways to improve the knee pain you feel with running. ...

Have you ever heard that bending at the spine is bad for your back? If that were the case, wouldn't you expect the majority of people who do yoga, cycling, or gymnastics to have terrible back pain?

The gluteus muscles are important for support of the hip and movement of the pelvis on the spine. Unfortunately, we have the societal norm of sitting all the time (driving, working, waiting rooms) to thank for these muscles getting "turned off" or deactivated, and therefore being a big contributor to back and hip pain.

A recent article on painscience.com has described in great detail how poor posture really isn't as bad as we think it is. It's also debunked a popular theory called "Upper Cross Syndrome", in which researchers described a crossed pattern of tight and weak muscles located diagonally through the front and back of our neck and chest. In turns...

I get asked all the time "when is the best time to stretch" and "is that StretchZone place any good". If you mean what I think you mean when you say 'stretch' - which is passively pulling or having someone else pull or push on you while you lay there - I'd like to let you know that you never...

This is the first installment of the "exercises for injuries" series coming in the next few weeks. Here we describe how to make modifications to ensure that the stretch and position is not painful, and that you are maintaining erect posture and not slumping while you exercise.