Pure Physical Therapy Blog
 

For some reason everyone wants to roll around on the foam roller like its a rolling pin rolling out dough. Unfortunately, taut bands of muscle, or trigger points, typically don't smooth out if you just roll over them back and forth. I like to use the analogy of getting a massage -- sure it feels good, but you...

Here's an awesome exercise borrowed from FRC (Functional Range Conditioning) that we do with pretty much every client. The "hip 90/90" or "shin box" position allows you to activate both glutes at the same time while you actively work through the range on one side, and statically hold a contraction on the other.

If you want to be faster, here's a great drill to incorporate into your training regimen. This exercise is great for both runners and track athletes as it coordinates the calf and the hip to fire simultaneously as the opposite limb is flexing (thats running!). This is important because the calf and the hip provide the main propulsion force...

Watch the video for tips on how to fully engage the entire body when you are doing a plank. You should be tired in 20-30 seconds if you are really activating everything you should be. This is hard for everyone!! That's why it's called the Hard Style Plank! (I think)

I am frequently approached with the same age old question: Why am I not losing weight? People tend to give me the usual list of reasons why they think they should be losing weight: I am eating 'x' calories per day. I'm running a couple of times a week. I'm lifting weights. But I am still overweight and that number on the scale won't budge...

Last week I was asked by a client, "Why perform CARs (Controlled Articulated Rotations) with my shoulders?" There had been a few physical therapists who had told her that moving into full endrange would be bad for her, but my first thought was 'How could learning to control our extreme limits of motion be bad?' Why wouldn't you...

Medial Knee Drift (MKD) is the technical term for when you can't control your knee position during any portion of a squat or step-down exercise. This is probably one of the most common mistakes I see in the gym, even in athletes with trainers coaching them! Usually it's caused by weakness in the hip, which decreases control of the femur...